Category: Personal Blogs

  • A Gift from Gracie
    • An adult woman with intellectual disabilities successfully educated a friend why she shouldn't use the word "retard" as an insult. Her mother and author Dave Hingsburger share the story.
  • Accessibility 100: Do It Myself Blog by Glenda Watson Hyatt
    • This series of blog posts analyzes problems with accessibility that the author has encountered in her environment. The author shares advice for how these accessibility barriers could be resolved to enable full inclusion for people with disabilities.
  • After the Storms: Shelters Lack Access
    • This personal narritive reflects the author's experiences in a disaster shelter after a hurricane. The author is a person with a disability.
  • Aspergers Square 8
    • Beverly Harp, an adult autistic woman, uses her blog to discuss disability and autistic rights. She occasionally uses videos and visual arts to humorously examine mistaken assumptions that non-autistic people make about autistic people.
  • Assistive Technology Checklist
    • The author, a person with a disability, complied a checklist of what to look for and consider when purchasing an assistive technology.
  • Autism and Empathy
    • Works to undo the dehumanizing and mistaken idea that autistic people cannot empathize. Shares personal narratives, essays, and research by autistic adults, parents of autistic children, and professionals showing that autistic people, all along the spectrum, can experience the world in highly empathetic and sensitive ways.
  • Autismo Y Empatia
    • En este blog se intenta disipar mitos que por mucho tiempo existen sobre las personas en el espectro del autismo y la empatía. Encontrarán artículos escritos tanto por personas con autismo como de familiares amigos y profesionales, y otras personas que conocen que las personas con autismo pueden y sienten profunda empatía. Note that this is a Spanish sister site for the English site at http://www.autismandempathy.com/ which shares the same purpose of undoing the mistaken idea that autistic people necessarily lack empathy.
  • Being An Unperson
    • Blogger Amanda Baggs describes the ways in which people frequently dehumanize people with disabilities. This captioned video has been used in training staff who work with people with disabilities.
  • Diary of a Goldfish
    • A woman with physical disabilities writes about her experiences in life. She also writes about "disablism" (prejudice toward people with disabilities).
  • Disability Time
    • In this post the author talks about how frustrating it is that everything takes so much more time as a person with a disability.
  • Do it Myself Blog: Glenda Watson Hyatt
    • A young woman in Canada, who has cerebral palsy, describes life with a disability. Many of her posts focus on traveling and on accessibility issues.
  • Embracing the Social Model of Disability
    • In this post the author describes what certain social situations are like from the perspective of someone with autism.
  • Hand 2 Mouth
    • In this blog, the author--a person with disabilities--reviews various types of assistive technology, ranging from information and communication technology accessibility software to elbow crutches.
  • I Love the Smell of Progress in the Morning
    • In this post the author talks about how great it is to be able to shop independently at her local grocery store and have people be responsive to the needs of disabled shoppers.
  • In My Language
    • Blogger Amanda Baggs, an autistic woman, says: "Failure to learn your language is seen as a deficit but failure to learn my language is seen as so natural that people like me are ... viewed as non-communicative." With this video, Baggs shows us why this assumption is wrong.
  • Inky Ed
    • The author writes about the experiences of her son, Mac, who has multiple disabilities and is mainstreamed in a regular primary school classroom in Australia.
  • Journeys with Autism: Reports from Life on the Spectrum
    • Author Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg writes about her experiences as an autistic wife, mother, writer, editor, artist, photographer, and community volunteer. She is leader of the Vermont Chapter of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) in the United States.
  • MOM - Not Otherwise Specified
    • A mother uses this blog to share her daily experiences raising an autistic son.
  • Neurodiversity, Self-Determination, and the Magic Pill
    • In this blog entry the author talks about how there is not a neutral environment for autistic people seeking treatment.
  • No Stereotypes Here
    • The author uses her blog to raise awareness about disability and autism needs and promotes the elimination of negative stigma and stereotypes about autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities and other forms of a neurologically diverse humanity.
  • Not Getting It
    • In this post, the author talks about the often-misused "disability awareness day."
  • Speaking my Mind and Heart
    • In honor of Autistics Speaking Day, the author composed this post: a celebration of her identity as a person with autism.
  • Suicide Beyond the Question of Choice
    • In this blog entry the author says that taking time to discuss the issue of physician-assisted suicide takes time and research away from helping people with disabilities actually live a better life.
  • Tactile the World
    • Christine Amanda Roschaert, a deafblind woman from the United States, writes about her experiences traveling around the world, including in Nigeria and in Asia.
  • The Seated View
    • The author, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis, writes about her experiences in life. Shares her opinions on a range of topics, some disability related and some not.
  • This is Our Reality
    • On how it feels to know your parents would have aborted you if they had known you would be born with a disability.
  • Videos and Stuff: On Being Considered Retarded
    • In this blog post and captioned video, Amanda Baggs explains why she is more offended by the assumption that being "retarded" is bad than she is at being assumed to be "retarded."
  • Why Disability Rights Activists Oppose Physician-Assisted Suicide
    • The author writes that "right to die" legislation will put subtle pressure on people with disabilities who may see themselves as a burden to their families to kill themselves.
  • Words Hit Like a Fist
    • Cards with the slogan "Words Hit Like A Fist" are being used to educate people about why disability-related slurs hurt. Author Dave Hingsburger describes the inspiration for these cards.