Category: Art

Categories Include: Drawing or Painting from Still Life; Drawing or Painting from Nature; Drawing or Painting from a Living Person; Original Imaginitve Composition in Color; Craft; and Study of Art
  • A History of Art for Beginners and Students
    • Painting, Sculpture, Architecture Author: Clara Erskine Clement
  • A History Of Greek Art
    • by F. B. Tarbell
  • African Art
    • This course will introduce you to the art and architecture of Africa from a Western art historical perspective. This Western perspective is influenced by developments in modern European art, which have claimed African art as an inspiration for more “primitive,” intuitive art forms.
  • African Fractals
    • A fractal is a pattern that repeats itself at different scales. It is ideal for modeling nature: a tree is a branch of a branch of a branch; mountains are peaks within peaks; clouds are puffs of puffs, and so on.
  • American Art
    • This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. We will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity.
  • Art and Culture
    • This site features a collection of lesson plans, able to be sorted by grade, subtopic, and number of class periods.
  • Art Appreciation and Techniques
    • The goal of this course is to encourage you to develop an interest in and appreciation for art in all its variety and learn how to express this appreciation in an informed and critical way.
  • Art History
    • Spontaneous conversations about works of art where the speakers are not afraid to disagree with each other or art history orthodoxy. Videos are made by Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker along with other contributors. From 400 C.E. to 1960 C.E.
  • Art of Ancient Greece and Rome
    • In this course, we will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of “geometric art” (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity.
  • Art of the Islamic World
    • This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. This course is organized around the major dynasties under which Islamic art and architecture were produced.
  • Art Studio Chalkboard: Information for Artists and Students
    • These pages are a resource for artists and art students that focus on the technical fundamentals of perspective, shading, color and painting. They were compiled and designed by Ralph Larmann, art faculty member in the University of Evansville Art Department, and are intended for educational use only.
  • Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: An Interactive Textbook
    • An introduction to visual arts and design that stresses the components of visual thinking and visual language underlying design and the fine arts.
  • Arts of Asia
    • This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. It is organized into three units that focus on the art and architecture of India, China, and Japan respectively.
  • Arts of Latin America
    • A chronological and thematic survey of the major themes and developments in the history of Latin American art, this course traces the evolution of visual culture over approximately four millennia.
  • Baroque Art to Neoclassicism
    • This course will examine the history of Western art from approximately 1600 to approximately 1800—a period that bridges the gap from the Renaissance to the earliest days of the Modern era. Beginning with the Baroque in Counter-Reformation Italy and concluding with Neoclassicism in the late 18th century, we will trace the stylistic developments in Europe and America through a variety of religious, political, and philosophical movements.
  • Buddhist Art
    • This course serves as an introduction to the Buddhist artistic traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas. It is organized into four units based on the development of Buddhist schools and artistic traditions in Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and China, Korea, and Japan.
  • Contemporary Art
    • In common conversation, we often use the phrase “contemporary art” to refer to current artistic production—the art being produced today. However, in the art history field, the phrase denotes a specific period of art and artistic practice starting in the 1960s and continuing today.
  • Culturally-Situated Design Tools
    • Many cultural designs are based on mathematical principles. This page will help students learn standards-based math and computing as they simulate the original artifacts, and develop their own creations.
  • Early Christian and Byzantine Art
    • In this course, we will study the history of Eastern (Orthodox) Christian art. The course begins with an overview of the emergence of Christianity in the Late Antique period and the formation of the Christian visual language that grew out of the Classical tradition.
  • Free Art Lessons
    • This section offers lessons in a variety of mediums from oil painting and watercolours to charcoal and pencil, alongside some tutorials directly from Art Graphica's G. Banns.
  • Frida Kahlo, Frieda and Diego Rivera, 1931
    • Frida Kahlo, Frieda and Diego Rivera​, 1931, oil on canvas, 39-3/8 x 31 inches or 100.01 x 78.74 cm (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art). Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker. Painted in San Francisco during the artist's first trip outside of Mexico. She accompanied her husband Diego Rivera who was painting in the United States and would, at the end of the year, be the subject of a retrospecive at The Museum of Modern Art in New York. The banderole carried by the bird above the artist states: Here you see us, me, Frieda Kahlo​, with my beloved husband Diego Rivera, I painted these portraits in the beautiful city of San Francisco, California, for our friend Mr. Albert Bender, and it was the month of April of the year 1931. Note: Kahlo changed her German name, Frieda, to Frida. (Art History; 1907-1960 - Age of Global Conflict; American Modernism)
  • Gustav Klimt, Beethoven Frieze
    • Gustav Klimt, Beethoven Frieze, Vienna Secession, 1902 (casein paint, gold paint, black and color chalk, graphite on plaster with various appliqué materials including mirror, mother-of-pearl and curtain rings, height 2.1 - 2 meters, overall length 34.1 meters (long walls 13.9 meters, front wall 6.3 meters), Vienna Secession building (on loan from the Österreichische Galerie Belvedere)) A conversation with Khan Academy's Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris. (Art History; 1848-1907 - Industrial Revolution II; Symbolism & Art Nouveau)
  • Gustav Klimt's The Kiss
    • Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-8, oil and gold leaf on canvas, 180 x 180 cm (Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna) (Art History; 1848-1907 - Industrial Revolution II; Symbolism & Art Nouveau)
  • Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day
    • Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, oil on canvas 83-1/2 x 108-3/4 inches / 212.2 x 276.2 cm (The Art Institute of Chicago). (Art History; 1848-1907 - Industrial Revolution II; Impressionism)
  • Human Figure in Charcoal
    • Vine Charcoal can be a tricky medium to manipulate successfully in smaller drawings, especially when drawing people. This article follows a step-by-step example in drawing the female nude using a slightly different approach that will hopefully yield more satisfying results.
  • Introduction to Anders Zorn
    • This is an article as opposed to tutorial, written by Swedish artist Mattias Viinanen and edited by myself. It looks briefly at the life of the great Swedish oil painting master, Anders Zorn.
  • Introduction to Western Art History: Pre-historic to High Gothic
    • In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of the High Gothic period in fourteenth-century Europe.
  • Introduction to Western Art History: Proto-Renaissance to Contemporary Art
    • In this course, we will study important movements and some influential artists in Western art history. We will begin with the “Proto-Renaissance” in Italy in the 13th century and continue through to the late 20th century.
  • Modern Art
    • In this course, you will study the various artistic movements that comprise 19th- and 20th-century modern art. Each unit will cover a significant period in the history of modern art and explore the ways in which both the principal figures from each period and the corresponding movements challenged the limits of art through the incorporation of modern life.
  • Picturing America
    • Picturing America brings masterpieces of American art into classrooms and libraries nationwide. Through this innovative program, students and citizens will gain a deeper appreciation of our country’s history and character through the study and understanding of its art.
  • Portrait Sketching Using Brush Techniques
    • This article explores the use of a bristle brush to sketch the face of a 19th century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Charcoal on tinted acrylic primed paper.
  • Roman Architecture
    • In this course, we will study the architecture of Ancient Rome, beginning with its origins in the eighth century BC, and continuing through the fourth century AD with the move of the Roman capital to Constantinople.
  • The Fibonacci Sequence For Visual Layout
    • The Fibonacci Sequence is a numerical convention that can be translated into many forms. It has been used in mathematics, architecture, poetry, music, art, and even as a system for predicting the growth of the stock market. It was developed by a man named Leonardo of Pisa.
  • The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism
    • In this course, we will focus on becoming “literate” in the art of the Italian Renaissance, on identifying the effects that the Renaissance had on the arts of Italy, and discovering the ways in which specific historical developments impacted those arts from the end of the thirteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century.
  • Twentieth Century Art
    • This course explores the history of cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in the Western world (Europe and the United States). We will concentrate on major styles in painting and sculpture, including Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art.
  • Victorian Art
    • Collection of several types of art from the Victorian Times.
  • Victorian Design: An Overview
    • Styles and movements, individual designers, ceramics, jewelry, furniture, metalwork, textiles, wallpaper, stained glass and book design.
  • Wetcanvas Basics 101 Class
    • A compilation of guest lectures from website Wetcanvas's Drawing and Sketching Forum, from perspective to celebrity portrait drawing.
  • Wikipedia Arts Portal
    • Subportals: Architecture, Comics, Dance, Film, Literature, Music, Opera, Photography, Poetry, Radio, Television, Theatre and Visual arts.
  • Wikipedia Visual Arts Portal
    • Visual arts are a class of art forms focusing on the creation of works which are primarily visual in nature, such as painting, drawing, photography, printmaking, and filmmaking. This portal has category and topic subsections.
  • William Holman Hunt and Typological Symbolism
    • In 1873 when William Holman Hunt exhibited The Shadow of Death, The Saturday Review commented that the painter's intention "is to elevate materialism by mysticism, and to make even the accessories of an inanimate realism instinct with spiritual symbolism". Despite the writer's phrasing, which suggests that symbolism can be poured into a picture like a dose of castor oil, he is essentially correct: a major part of Hunt's concern with this painting, as with his other major works, was to create a modern pictorial symbolism that would solve the problems he found inherent in realistic styles.
  • William Turner, Afternoon Study
    • A small pencil study based on the watercolour painting, "The Great Falls of the Reichenbach" by British artist William Turner. Step-by-step instructions demonstrating the rapid build up of composition, and hatching effects to enhance a sense of form and direction.
  • Wood, American Gothic, 1930
    • Grant Wood, American Gothic, 1930, oil on beaver board, 78 x 65.3 cm / 30-3/4 x 25-3/4 inches (The Art Institute of Chicago) Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker. (Art History; 1907-1960 - Age of Global Conflict; American Modernism)