Category: Resources for Administrators

  • Action Committee for Women in Prison
    • Advocates for the humane and compassionate treatment of all incarcerated women. Collaborates with other organizations dedicated to reforming the criminal justice system. Works for the release of individual women prisoners who pose no danger to society. Informs and educates the public; Promotes a shift of focus from punishment to rehabilitation and restorative justice.
  • Adult College Completion Tool Kit
    • This Adult College Completion Tool Kit is designed to connect state administrators and local practitioners to the strategies, resources, and technical assistance tools resulting from the Department’s work. Use this information to identify and implement state adult education leadership priorities.
  • Bringing Family Literacy to Incarcerated Settings: An Instructional Guide
    • This booklet describes how to begin a family literacy program for incarcerated family members.
  • Building Jobs/Rebuilding Lives: Introduction
    • Research and experience in the field of corrections have shown clearly that there is a relationship between employment of ex-offenders and lower recidivism rates. There can be no question that employment at a living wage has a tremendous positive influence on the future course of ex-offenders' lives and on society in general.
  • Building Jobs/Rebuilding Lives: Summary
    • It is obvious that providing ex-offenders with living-wage employment can be an important tool in helping them build new lives. This, in turn, is a major factor in breaking the cycle of events that leads to recidivism. Although ex-offenders face many barriers in finding meaningful employment, there are ways to go about reducing these barriers, and increasing their employment opportunities.
  • California Coalition for Women Prisoners
    • CCWP is a grassroots social justice organization, with members inside and outside prison, that challenges the institutional violence imposed on women, transgender people, and communities of color by the prison industrial complex (PIC). We see the struggle for racial and gender justice as central to dismantling the PIC and we prioritize the leadership of the people, families, and communities most impacted in building this movement.
  • Center for Community Alternatives: Innovative Solutions for Justices
    • The Center for Community Alternatives (CCA) works with people who would otherwise be incarcerated as confirmed by a Vera Institute of Justice study. For every person mandated to CCA, NYS taxpayers save at least the $32,000 in annual state prison costs. Even more savings accrue through reducing time in local jails or juvenile justice placements which cost more than twice the amount of state prison. In comparison, CCA's programs are roughly $ 10,000 per person per year or less. In an average year, CCA successfully diverts 100 adults and as many juveniles from more costly incarceration, saving New York State millions of dollars. Equally important, this reduces the collateral consequences of incarceration, strengthens families and builds safer communities.
  • Character Education: Catch Them Young
    • This book discusses the ideas, goals, and values of teaching character eduction to youth, or teaching people to make sound, moral judgments. The ideas presented in this book have contributed towards many successes in schools with existing programs. By Mary Abraham Gojeh.
  • College for Adults
    • This website will help you with career planning, college selection and the application process. It will also suggest ways to find money to pay for college, and direct you to resources to help you prepare for college-level work.
  • Employing Ex-Offenders
    • Work opportunities provide hope and a chance for achieving success to newly released Federal ex-offenders. Employers are encouraged to participate in creating opportunities to help individuals become law-abiding, productive citizens.
  • Enforcing Religious Freedom in Prison
    • The report examines government efforts to enforce federal civil rights laws prohibiting religious discrimination in the administration and management of federal and state prisons in the United States.
  • Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning
    • A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies. From the U.S. Department of Education. Revised September 2010.
  • Family & Corrections Network
    • Family and Corrections Network provides ways for those concerned with families of prisoners to share information and experiences in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Our mission is to uphold the value of families of prisoners.
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons
    • The Federal Bureau of Prisons (often referred to operationally as the BOP) is a federal law enforcement agency subdivision of the United States Department of Justice and is responsible for the administration of the federal prison system.
  • Federal Rules of Evidence/Introduction
    • The Federal Rules of Evidence are a staple of American legal education. An understanding of the rules is critical when arguing a case in the courtroom, and important for any lawyer seeking to protect their client when a suit is filed. Article I of the Federal Rules sets forth some basic laws which govern the application of the other rules of evidence.
  • Federal Rules of Evidence/Judicial Notice
    • Article II of the Federal Rules of Evidence deals with judicial notice.
  • Federal Rules of Evidence/Presumptions in Civil Actions
    • Article III of the Federal Rules of Evidence deals with presumptions and burdens of proof. It applies to civil actions—cases arising under non-criminal laws, such as contract, property and tort.
  • Federal Rules of Evidence/Relevancy
    • This is Article IV of the Federal Rules of Evidence; it covers relevancy--the first consideration in determining the admissibility of evidence.
  • Female Offender Programs
    • The BOP provides female offenders with appropriate programs and services to meet their physical, social, and psychological needs.
  • Girls Abused in New York's Juvenile Prisons
    • Girls in New York’s juvenile prisons are being abused and neglected by state authorities, Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union charged in a report released today.
  • Inmate Mental Health Treatment and Counseling
    • The Bureau provides a full range of mental health treatment through staff psychologists and psychiatrists. The Bureau also provides forensic services to the courts, including a range of evaluative mental health studies outlined in Federal statutes.
  • Inmate Skills
    • Through the Inmate Skills Development (ISD) initiative, the Bureau is focusing on building the kinds of skills essential to successful reintegration into society – ranging from activities of daily living, such as budgeting, to cognitive skills, such as the ability to maintain self-control.
  • Journal of Prisoners on Prisons
    • The Journal of Prisoners on Prisons (JPP) is a prisoner written, academically oriented & peer reviewed, non-profit journal, based on the tradition of the penal press. It brings the knowledge produced by prison writers together with academic arguments to enlighten public discourse about the current state of carceral institutions.
  • Juveniles in the Bureau
    • Congress recognized the special needs of juveniles with the passage of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) in 1974. This act provided federal grants to states and cities seeking to improve their handling and disposition of delinquent and status offenders.
  • Literacy Information aNd Communication System (LINCS)
    • Literacy Information aNd Communication System (LINCS) offers publications for families and educators of learners across the lifespan. A number of publications for educators and parents on early literacy.
  • Managing Mental Illness in Prison
    • Twelve to fifty percent of the population in prisons experiences some form of mental or emotional problem. There are greater obstacles for the inmate with mental illness and for those who would provide care and treatment for the inmate with mental illness. This is the focus of this report.
  • Mapping Your Financial Journey: Helping Adults Plan for College
    • This site helps adults who are wanting to start college set goals, manage money, cope with college costs, and get financial aid.
  • Marketing Ex-Offenders
    • Placing ex-offenders in meaningful employment can be thought of as essentially a marketing activity. Just as architects, manufacturers, Realtors, and bankers market their products and services to the home building industry, so too can ex-offenders with their skill and abilities be marked as a "product," that is, as potentially valuable employees.
  • No Second Chance: People With Criminal Records Denied Access to Public Housing
    • Exclusions from public housing are among the harshest of a range of punitive laws that burden people with criminal records. Nevertheless, to date they have received scant attention from policymakers, elected officials, advocates for the poor, and the public at large.
  • Office of Justice Programs
    • The Office of Justice Programs (OJP) provides innovative leadership to federal, state, local, and tribal justice systems, by disseminating state-of-the art knowledge and practices across America, and providing grants for the implementation of these crime fighting strategies.
  • Principals of Drug Addiction Treatment: a Research-Based Guide
    • To share the results of this extensive body of research and foster more widespread use of scientifically based treatment components, the National Institute on Drug Abuse held the National Conference on Drug Addiction Treatment: From Research to Practice in April 1998 and prepared this guide.
  • Public Relations & Ex-Offenders
    • Public relations holds a unique position in the marketing approach to creating employment opportunities for ex-offenders. Because of its nature, "PR" can play a major part in almost every aspect of a placement program.
  • Recent Use of Behavioral Genetics in Criminal Cases
    • This presentation will discusses the recent attempts by criminal defendants to introduce genetic predisposition testimony to negate the voluntariness of their conduct, to negate mens rea, to bolster an insanity defense or as mitigating evidence during sentencing.
  • Release Preparation
    • The prospect of having to search for meaningful work upon release from prison can be a daunting one. Many inmates acquire valuable work experience and skills through programs like Federal Prison Industries, vocational training opportunities, and/or other occupational education courses offered at Bureau facilities.
  • State of the Bureau Publication 2010
    • This annual publication provides a summary of the year's activities, statistical data, and a facilities directory.
  • Substance Abuse Treatment
    • Twenty years ago, the Bureau implemented its current drug abuse treatment strategy. The longest running drug abuse program in Bureau history, the treatment strategy has grown and changed with treatment advances of the times.
  • Time Management
    • The aim of this lesson is to develop students' understanding of the importance of managing time.
  • Victim/Witness Notification Program
    • The Bureau's Victim/Witness Notification Program ensures that crime victims and witnesses enrolled in the program are notified within specific time frames of an inmate's admission to or release from an institution, and about other events concerning an inmate, such as changes in status or parole hearings.
  • Victims of Affirmance Without Opinion
    • The very nature of affirmance without opinion makes it very difficult to do any systematic search of an appellate court's actions to find abuses. No details are written about the cases, and the fact that the vast majority of those are unpublished. This lack of transparency/openness is the most pernicious aspects of the practice. To do any systematic study would require a visit to the archives of an appellate court to review not the decision which give no information, but the appellate briefs themselves. Not only would this be a Herculean effort for those attempting it, it would consume more clerical support at the Court than would likely be tolerated. So, the only way victims of nonopinions can be found is haphazardly, through personal networking or review of the rare report that makes it into the media.
  • When I Die, They'll Send Me Home
    • Approximately 227 youth have been sentenced to die in California’s prisons. These young people have been sentenced to prison for the rest of their lives, with no opportunity for parole and no chance for release. Remarkably, many of the adults who were codefendants and took part in their crimes received lower sentences and will one day be released from prison.
  • Why Literature in Prison?
    • The study of literature offers many ways to improve literacy: it gives access to language, reading, writing, a shared culture, and one's own self. Still, not recognizing the power it has to change lives, many teachers shy away from using literature to teach offenders.
  • Why Literature? Critical Thinking
    • The world of the incarcerated prisoner tends to be a narrow and self-absorbed one. There is a tendency toward the "woe is me" way of thinking that makes teaching basic skills difficult.
  • Why Literature? The Dramatic Text
    • While literature opens us up to our imaginations and thus to our possibilities, theatre puts imagination into action. Our preoccupations with personal issues diminish as we learn to see the world through someone else's eyes.
  • Why Literature? The Power of Stories
    • Our ideas about literature in prison are based in part on a belief that offenders often commit criminal acts because they operate from a value system that gives priority to emotions and primal instinct rather than to reason and critical thinking. We need to challenge that single-minded value system by using novels and short stories that unfold the complexity and diversity of character.
  • Womens Health & Education Center (WHEC)
    • Women's health and status is a very complex and challenging issue for the developing and industrialized countries both. Women face enormous obstacles – prejudice, ostracism, domestic violence, poverty, hunger and virtually no access to medical care and life saving medicines. Site available in English, Spanish, French, Russian, Chinese, and Arabic.
  • Women's Help Index
    • List of resources to help women in need. Topics include: "The Greatest Escape, Special for Domestic Violence Victims", "Tips for Testifying", "Know Your Rights", "Beware Child Protective Services...", etc.
  • Women's Institute for Financial Education
    • The Women’s Institute for Financial Education (WIFE.org) is the oldest non-profit organization dedicated to providing financial education to women in their quest for financial independence. We are a charitable organization under Internal Revenue Code Sec. 501(c)(3). All donations to WIFE.org are tax-deductible.
  • Women's Prison Association
    • WPA is a service and advocacy organization committed to helping women with criminal justice histories realize new possibilities for themselves and their families. Our program services make it possible for women to obtain work, housing, and health care; to rebuild their families; and to participate fully in civic life.