Category: Accessibility

  • Access for Multiple Disabilities
    • This article focuses on three types of learners who benefit from assistive technology devices: hard of hearing learners, visually impaired learners, and learning disabled individuals.
  • Accessibility Basics
    • When you create a web site, accessibility—making the web site usable by everyone, regardless of their ability or disability—should always be a central concern. This article discusses what it is, and why it's important.
  • Accessibility Testing
    • Web accessibility testing is a subset of usability testing where the users under consideration have disabilities that affect how they use the web. The end goal, in both usability and accessiblity, is to discover how easily people can use a web site.
  • Accessible Digital Office Document Project
    • This site is offers techniques for creating accessible word processing documents, spreadsheets and presentations.
  • Adapting Keyboards for Multiple Disabilities
    • This article gives technical and non-technical ideas to make keyboards accessible across a range of disabilities
  • Assistive Technology
    • This article focuses on three types of assistive technology and looks at how they are incorporated to meet individual needs and address educational standards for students with moderate to severe disabilities in public school settings.
  • Critical Components for Technology Plans
    • Truly successful technology plans incorporate strong goals for learning, organization, professional development, a technology committee, flexibility, a budget, and continuous evaluation.
  • Designing Accessible Web Pages: Creating Web Pages Accessible to All
    • This page includes suggestions and example code to build accessible web pages, espcecially for those who are blind or have a vision impairment.
  • Designing for Accessibility
    • This page gives concrete suggestions as to Web sites can be built and designed in accessible ways.
  • Differences in Student Characteristics in Face-to-Face and Online Cohorts in a Teacher Preparation Program in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
    • Over the past decade, teacher preparation programs in education of the deaf and hard of hearing have integrated online learning, but there have been few systematic attempts to determine to what extent, if any, this may be associated with a change in relevant student characteristics. The purpose of the present study was to compare student characteristics of the last four face-to-face and the first four hybrid (combined online and face-to-face) cohorts in a specialist-teacher preparation program that underwent a transition from face-to-face to hybrid formats.
  • First Steps in Producing Accessible Publications
    • This booklet has two core aims. First, to assist those involved in producing publications to explore the need and opportunity to produce their publications in a range of formats to meet the diverse needs of their intended audience. The second aim is to provide basic information on how to produce these various formats. The booklet is not intended as a comprehensive guide to creating accessible publications, but it outlines many of the ‘first steps.’
  • Getting Started: Making a Web Site Accessible
    • An initial introduction to resources for people new to Web accessibility. Includes why web accessibility is needed, what makes a site accessible, how to evaluate sites for accessibility, and more.
  • ICT Accessibility
    • Links to resources for making websites, public access terminals, telecommunication devices, and software accessible for people with disabilities.
  • Interactive Whiteboards
    • This article describes an interactive whiteboard and tells how students, teachers, and presenters benefit from its use.
  • Making Graphic Navigation Style Accessible
    • This article explains what graphic or spatial navigation style is and how it can be made accessible to people with disabilities.
  • Users with Disability Need Not Apply? Web Accessibility in Ireland
    • This paper reports on a project to carry out an automated baseline survey of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)compliance of Web sites based in Ireland. Summary results are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for policy action, relevant both in Ireland and beyond.
  • Web Accessibility for Older Adults
    • Includes suggestions for making the web accessible to older adults in several ways: navigation, color and contrast, font, page length, and distractions.
  • Web Accessibility for the Hearing Impaired
    • This article describes how web sites can be built to accomodate the hard of hearing.
  • Web Content Accessibility and Mobile Web
    • With global mobile phone use at an all time high, there has been a surge of interest in developing Web sites that are accessible from a mobile device. Similarly, making Web sites accessible for people with disabilities is an integral part of high quality Web sites, and in some cases a legal requirement.
  • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0
    • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity and combinations of these.
  • Website Design for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
    • This article gives reasons why web sites should be built with the deaf and hard of hearing community in mind and describes what accessible web sites should look like.