Category: Catholicism

history and beliefs of including Anglicanism, Roman Catholic, Utrecht
  • 1662 Book of Common Prayer
    • Used by the Church of England, of the Anglican Communion.
  • A Perspective on Clergy Sexual Abuse
    • By Dr. Thomas Plante. An article on the events regarding child sexual abuse committed by Catholic priests.
  • Angele Dei
    • Angele Dei, also know as the Prayer to One's Guardian Angel, was in the past attributed to St. Anselm (c1033-1109), for it appears in medieval collections of St. Anselm's works. However, it is clear that this prayer was added to Anselm's works sometime after his death.
  • Appalling Acts in God's Name
    • By Michael Nielsen. What little research exists on the topic suggests that about 2% of Catholic priests engage in pedophilia, and an additional 4% in ephebophilia (sexual contact with post-pubescent adolescents). How do a few priests come to dominate the headlines?
  • Ave Maria
    • The Ave Maria is perhaps the most popular of all the Marian prayers. It is composed of two distinct parts, a Scriptural part and an intercessory part.
  • Baptism
    • Authoritative statement of doctrine according to the Catholic church.
  • Benedicte Dominum
    • Benedicite Dominum, or the Canticle of the Three Young Men is taken from the Old Testament book of Daniel (Dan. 3, 57-88; 56). It is used at Lauds for Sundays and feast days.
  • Benedictio Mensae
    • Blessing before and after meals.
  • Bulls and Briefs
    • A bull may be conveniently defined to be "an Apostolic letter with a leaden seal," to which one may add that in its superscription the pope invariably takes the title of episcopus, servus servorum Dei.
  • Catholic Education: A Journal of Inquiry and Practice
    • This open access journal represents Catholic colleges and universities, Catholic education leaders, and scholars from a variety of disciplines who are collectively committed to contributing research and encouraging good practice in Catholic elementary, secondary, and higher education by advancing the field of Catholic educational research. From a Catholic perspective.
  • Christe Sanctorum Decus
    • This hymn, less the concluding doxology, is attributed on questionable grounds to Rabanus Maurus (776-856), a pupil of Alcuin. It is traditionally used for Laudes for the feasts of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael. Today, verses 2, 3, and 4 of the hymn are used for their feast on September 29.
  • Commemoratio Sanctae Trinitatis
    • Morning and evening prayers from the Roman Breviary for Trinity Sunday.
  • Confiteor
    • A Confiteor is a penitential prayer where we acknowledge our sinfulness and seek God's mercy and forgiveness. Confiteors have been part of Christianity from the beginning.
  • Conversi ad Dominum Deum
    • Written by St. Augustine (354-430) to conclude several of his sermons. This one is found in his Sermo CLXXXIII.
  • Deus, Qui Fidei Sacramenta
    • This prayer comes from the Mass for the Feast of the Transfiguration, Aug. 6. This particular version is taken from the '62 Missal.
  • Domine Sancte, Pater Omnipotens
    • The text of this prayer appears in the Stimulus Divini Amoris. In the past this work has been attributed to St. Bonaventure (1218-1274) and to Henri of Beaume (d. 1439), but it is actually the work of Jacobus Mediolanensis (13th/14th century).
  • Doxologia Minor
    • A short expression of praise to the Trinity from the very early Church. Authors such as Hippolytus (d. 235) and Origen (ca 231) use very similar phrases in praise of the Trinity.
  • Duodecim Apostoli
    • While references to the Twelve Apostles frequently appear in Scripture, the actual list of names of the Twelve Apostles appears only four times; Mt 10:2-4, Mk 3:16-19, Lk 6:14-16, and Acts 1:13. Each list generally follows the same order and contains the same names.
  • Gratiarum Actio ad Trinitatem
    • This prayer was written by St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), Doctor of the Church. The prayer is from her Dialogue on Divine Providence and appears in the Office of the Readings on her feast day, April 29.
  • Gratiarum Actio Pro Suscepto Baptismi Sacramento
    • Act of thanksgiving for receiving the sacrament of baptism.
  • Hail Mary
    • The Hail Mary (sometimes called the "Angelical salutation", sometimes, from the first words in its Latin form, the "Ave Maria") is the most familiar of all the prayers used by the Universal Church in honour of our Blessed Lady.
  • Homosexual Candidates, the Seminary and the Priesthood
    • The Congregation for Catholic Education in accord with the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments and with the approval of Benedict XVI issued an instruction on the admission of homosexual candidates to the seminary and Holy Orders. The instruction is singular in purpose: "whether to admit to the seminary and to holy orders candidates who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies."
  • How to Recite the Holy Rosary
    • Simple instructions on how to recite prayers associated with the Holy Rosary, a popular and important Catholic prayer.
  • Instiutio Catholica
    • This list was compiled from a number of prayer books that were composed from the 18th to the mid 20th century. Prayer books from this period would often contain short summaries on the teachings of the Church and the duties of good Christians.
  • Introductio
    • The Thesaurus Precum Latinarum is a collection of Latin prayers and Latin hymns with English translations and brief commentaries. The commentaries outline the origins, history and use of many of the items with the prayers themselves being drawn from the entire 2,000 year history of the Church.
  • Oratio ad ss. Trinitatem Pro Felici Morte
    • Prayer to the most holy trinity for a happy death.
  • Oratio Dominica
    • This prayer was given to us by our Lord Jesus Christ Himself when the apostles asked Him to teach them how to pray (Mt 6:9-13) and thus the prayer has been a part of the Church since the very beginning. The Didache (1st-2nd century) commends the prayer to be recited by the faithful three times during the day.
  • Papal Bull Seal
    • The papal seal affixed to most bulls is made of lead and is inscribed with the name of the reigning pope on one side and representations of the heads of St. Peter and St. Paul on the other side.
  • Papal Encyclicals Online
    • This is not a Vatican site.
  • Pentecost (Whitsunday)
    • A feast of the universal Church which commemorates the Descent of the Holy Ghost upon the Apostles, fifty days after the Resurrection of Christ, on the ancient Jewish festival called the "feast of weeks" or Pentecost (Exodus 34:22; Deuteronomy 16:10). Whitsunday is so called from the white garments which were worn by those who were baptised during the vigil; Pentecost ("Pfingsten" in German), is the Greek for "the fiftieth" (day after Easter).
  • Photographs of Medieval Papal and Church documents
    • The papal seal affixed to most bulls is made of lead and is inscribed with the name of the reigning pope on one side and representations of the heads of St. Peter and St. Paul on the other side with the abbreviation SPASPE. SPA is for St .Paul and SPE St. Peter.
  • Praecepta Decalogi
    • The ten commandments in Latin.
  • Professio fidei Tridentina
    • The "Professio fidei Tridentina", also known as the "Creed of Pope Pius IV", is one of the four authoritative Creeds of the Catholic Church. It was issued on November 13, 1565 by Pope Pius IV in his bull "Iniunctum nobis" under the auspices of the Council of Trent (1545 - 1563).
  • Roman Catholicism in Spain
    • Anonymous author
  • Sex Praecepta Ecclesiae
    • The six precepts of the Church come from Canon Law and are a summary of the duties of all Catholics. The list varies from region to region. This list is the one for the United States.
  • Signum Crucis
    • The Sign of the Cross is not only an action, but a statement of faith itself. In this simple gesture one is not only making a sign of our redemption, the Cross, but is also expressing faith in the Blessed Trinity.
  • Splendor Paternae Gloriae
    • Written by St. Ambrose (340-397), this hymn is a companion hymn to his Aeternae rerum Conditor. Splendor paternae gloriae is a beautiful morning hymn asking for help and guidance throughout the day. It is directed to the Trinity, and especially to Christ as the light of the world. The hymn is traditionally sung at Monday Lauds and is used in the Liturgia Horarum at Lauds for Monday of the first and third weeks of the Psalter during Ordinary Time.
  • Symbola
    • There are three early Creeds, or Professions of Faith as they are also known, that are considered official in the Catholic Church; the Nicene Creed, the Athanasian Creed and the Apostles' Creed. These three creeds form an important statement about what we as Catholics believe.
  • Symbolum Apostolorum
    • The present form of the Apostles' Creed first appears in the 6th century in the writings of Caesarius of Arles (d 542). However, it can be traced in one form or another back to Apostolic times.
  • Symbolum Nicaenum
    • The Symbolum Nicaenum, or Nicene Creed, has a complex history. It was first promulgated at the Council of Nicea (325), though in an abbreviated form from what we have below. St. Athanasius attributes its composition to the Papal Legate to the Council, Hossius of Cordova.
  • Te Deum
    • Te Deum, also sometimes called the Ambrosian Hymn because if its association with St. Ambrose, is a traditional hymn of joy and thanksgiving. First attributed to Sts. Ambrose, Augustine, or Hilary, it is now accredited to Nicetas, Bishop of Remesiana (4th century).
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia
    • The Catholic Encyclopedia contains thousands of articles about everything relating to Catholicism and Christianity, including interests, religious beliefs, doctrine, prominent figures in history, events in history, artifacts, and more.
  • The Ceremonies of The Holy-Week at Rome
    • By The Rt. Rev. Monsignor Baggs, Bishopo of Pella. Topics include mass, Palm Sunday, the Divine Office, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday
  • The Church, the Council and the Unconscious: How Hidden Forces Shaped the Catholic Church
    • by James Arraj. A brief look at extraordinary phenomena will alert us to the type of forces that are at work, but our task is much more difficult, for it is to glimpse how similar unconscious forces influence religious life, the new movements, the church’s teaching on birth control, the papacy and many other aspects of contemporary Catholic life.
  • The Council of Trent
    • The canons and decrees of the sacred and oecumenical Council of Trent, that rejected the Protestant Reformation.
  • The Liberal Catholic Movement in England: The "Rambler" and its Contributers
    • The Liberal Catholic movement of the 19th century was an attempt to bridge the gap between the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church and the dominant secular principles of the age.
  • The Pope
    • From the Catholic Encyclopedia: The pope is the head of the Catholic church
  • The Pronunciation of Latin
    • Today, there are two main ways of pronouncing Latin. The two methods are very, very close to one another. Indeed if one is familiar with one method, only a little effort is needed to be able to use the other.
  • Thesaurus Precum Latinarum
    • The Thesaurus Precum Latinarum is a collection of Latin prayers and Latin hymns with English translations and brief commentaries. The collection contains a wide range of items, such as basic prayers, creeds, prayers before and after Mass, Eucharistic Adoration, Litanies, Hymns, Little Offices, Marian devotions, the Rosary, the Angelus, prayers to the Angels and Saints, and prayers for various occasions.
  • Thomas Aquinas (1225—1274)
    • Saint Thomas Aquinas was a Catholic Priest in the Dominican Order and one of the most important Medieval philosophers and theologians.
  • Titivillus "The Patron Demon of Scribes"
    • As with even the best of us, minds can wander from time to time and the monks were no exception. When this happened, errors would be introduced into the text. No one likes to take credit for his own mistakes, and true to human nature the monks invented Titivillus.
  • Veni, Sancte Spiritus
    • Veni, Sancte Spiritus, known as the Golden Sequence, is the sequence for the Mass for Pentecost. It is commonly regarded as one of the greatest masterpieces of sacred Latin poetry ever written. The hymn has been attributed to three different authors, King Robert II the Pious of France, Pope Innocent III, and Stephen Langton, Archbishop of Canterbury, of which the last is most likely the author.
  • Veni, Sancte Spiritus
    • A traditional prayer asking for the grace of the Holy Spirit. It has been used for centuries as a prayer of private devotion.
  • Victimae Paschali
    • Victimae Paschali is the Sequence for Easter Sunday.
  • Virtutes Theologicae
    • The origins of the Theological Virtues lie with Scripture. St. Paul writes in his letter to the Corinthians, "So faith, hope, and love remain, these three; but the greatest of these is love." (1Cor. 13:13). There and throughout Scripture the themes of faith, hope, and love are constantly stressed and thus they have been singled out and given the name 'the Theological Virtues'.
  • Weeping Statues and Icons - Blood, Water, Oil
    • Statues of the Virgin Mary have been known to spontaneously begin weeping blood, water, and oil from the eyes of the statue. The faithful see a miracle, while nonbelievers claim it as a hoax.